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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
at that point we'll deal with the debt ceiling. so it was a way to put some pressure on mitch mcconnell. but mitch mcconnell seems to think that okay we'll pass a budget in the senate and then use that as possible leverage with the republicans in the house who might hold up the debt ceiling. >> michael: that makes perfect sense that that is what they are trying to do it is really just passing the buck. the white house held a firm line on saying we're not going to negotiate at all on this debt ceiling, and it worked. do you think this is a lesson that may carry for four years, when they see themselves posturing this way rather than what they have done on other issues? do you think this might be contagious within the white house? >> remember bill clinton and what the definition of is, is. with barack obama it's sort of what the definition of negotiation is. they will deal with the debt ceiling, and that's when you will have very active negotiations over the budget. what the house has effectively done is put this on a similar path, a similar timetable as the
're going to face it again, you know, debt ceiling stuff, what is the republican strategy in dealing with the democrats? david. >> you know, mike, i was on capitol hill this week talking to top republicans, and i'm getting a sense and you're seeing it written about as well, that they would maybe like to step away from the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age and indexing to try to attach that to a debt-limit deal. do they move beyond the debt limit, try to g
that this deal now would have to include an extension of the debt ceiling that they just got to avoid the fiscal cliff. well, he ultimately folded on that. so as a tactical matter, even in their minority position, they can look at this and see, well, there is some gain to be gotten here if we keep pushing on this. i think the flip side of this is also a big challenge for the president. if he really wants to unshackle the economy, if he wants to get more robust economic growth, does he not want to be more proactive about dealing with some of these entitlements, with dealing with the budget picture, even where he has real problems with his supposed, you know, partners in this to republicans? does he not want to take advantage of the power he has to try to advance this, to get more robust economic growth independent of his misgivings about his partners here on capitol hill. >> chuck, i think it's fair to say that harry reid was somewhat marginalized during negotiation biden sort of swooped in to save the day. what do you see as his role going forward as we edge toward these upcoming fiscal cliffs?
but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of their three-day retreat saying they have a better chance of reaching their goal of broad spending cuts. and that means not making the demand in the next few weeks, which is exactly what it would mean because, according to most economists, we will hit that debt ceiling mid-february. >> so here's the question, bottom line, is is this a sure thing? will congress actually vote to raise the debt limit next week? >> well, there is a catch. the house gop, the leadership at least says what they are going to try to pass next week would raise the debt ceiling for three months but with a condition. and that would be that the house and senate pass budgets. it may seem simple but house republicans like to point out that they haven't passed a bu
's some type of deal on not slamming-- or raising the debt ceiling, just the tone, jay carney saying he's encouraged and the republicans trying to beat a deadline and things might be different. >> sure, i don't think anyone in this town is under any illusion, and magically the republicans and democrats are coming together and solve all of these big problems and singing kumbayah. but there are a host of things where they want to come together and find some common ground and the debt ceiling might be one of them, but the republicans have some caveats to that and want to make sure that the senate democrats pass a budget. something they haven't done in the last four years and put some heat on the democrats right there. even as both sides are talking about coming together on some of this, there's going to be an edge to it as well. let's not forget the president is still dealing with high unemployment. and wants to focus on gun control, immigration reform and get those done in the second term and still got things left over from the first term. stubbornly high unemployment said he's going to c
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)